Jason Patric Movies

˜I think the [real] conflict is jumping into a genre that is largely crap. Jason Patric, when asked if he experienced any conflicts with the physical demands of filming Speed 2 FOR better or for worse, Jason Patric’s first big break came at the expense of pal Kiefer Sutherland, with whom Patric co-starred in the 1987 cult classic vampire flick The Lost Boys. Their on-screen relationship in that film had a less-than-smiley culmination when poor Kiefer melted away into a puddle of goo, and relations between them couldn’t have been all that warm and fuzzy four years later, when Kiefer’s bride-to-be, one Julia Roberts, stood him up at the altar and ran off to Ireland with Jason. This eyebrow-raising turn of events prompted a watching world to collectively inquire, “Jason who?,” and a star was born. Never one to tolerate commitment in large doses, Ms. Roberts soon jettisoned poor Jason to traipse down the aisle with gangly crooner Lyle Lovett, whom she subsequently dumped in order to shack up with Daniel Day-Lewis, who got his walking papers when . . . oh, never mind. At any rate, Patric landed on his feet–he probably even shared a beer and a laugh …

Chazz Palminteri Movies

˜Oh, great reviews are the worst. They mislead you more than the bad ones, because they only fuel your ego. Then you only want another one, like potato chips or something, and the best thing you get is fat and bloated. I’d rather just refuse, thanks. Chazz Palminteri AS corny as this sounds, the tale of Chazz Palminteri reaffirms the American dream: a struggling actor from the Bronx achieves Hollywood success. Palminteri toiled for nearly two decades in nightclubs, off-Broadway theatres, and bit television roles before deciding that he would have to create the roles his tough-guy talent deserved. So, at the age of 36, Palminteri wrote and performed a 35-character one-man play that ultimately provided an entrée into the acting world’s elite.

He based that play, A Bronx Tale, on his childhood in New York’s meanest borough, where the Palminteri family lived in a fifth-floor walk-up on a bus driver’s salary. A natural storyteller, Chazz knew from age 13 that he wanted to be an actor. It was his talent as a singer, however, that helped him become a professional entertainer: he spent ten years after high school crooning in hotel lounges and as a member of a pop …

Nick Nolte Worth

˜If you feel you have a film that’s valid, you stick your ass on the line. Nick Nolte IT took 15 years for Nick Nolte to enter the limelight. He was a serious jock whose terrible grades disqualified him from playing football at five different colleges, and at 21, he was sentenced to 45 years in jail for selling fake draft cards. (The sentence was suspended.) He acted in regional theatres and small TV roles until he was 35. In that year, 1976, the athletic blond’s break came in the wake of his Emmy-nominated performance in Rich Man, Poor Man, television’s first miniseries. Cast in an uneven series of screen roles, Nolte’s reputation as a hunky, forceful actor was overshadowed by his problems with women and booze. In addition to his many failed relationships, he was slapped with a $4.5 million palimony suit by his eight-year companion, Karen Louise. Eighties hits like 48 HRS. and Down and Out in Beverly Hills were offset by several clunkers, but the ’90s began with a bang. He earned an Oscar nomination for his role as the sensitive, wounded hero of The Prince of Tides and gave impressive performances in Lorenzo’s Oil and in …

Chris O’Donnell Family

˜Next Big Thing–you hear all that crap. I’d be lying if I said I wasn’t psyched. Chris O’Donnell CORN-FED, white bread, wholesome, and fresh-faced are just some of the adjectives used to describe Chris O’Donnell’s “good looks.” O’Donnell began capitalizing on his face at age 12 by landing modeling assignments and commercials (you might remember him as the McDonald’s counter boy who served Michael Jordan). His big break came, at age 17, when he secured the role of Jessica Lange’s eldest son in Men Don’t Leave. He says he almost missed his chance because of other priorities, namely crew practice (“I blew off the first three auditions because my crew team was going to be on the evening news”).

It was fortuitous that O’Donnell’s strength was in playing regular-guy types because that was exactly what Hollywood was looking for. He was cast as the decent boy-next-door, again opposite Jessica Lange, in Tony Richardson’s Blue Sky, but the project, which earned Lange an Academy Award, was shelved for three years. His breakthrough role came with Scent of a Woman, in which he played a wholesome prep-school kid hired to guide a blind Al Pacino through New York City for one last …

Liam Neeson Age

June 7, 1952

˜In Los Angeles, it’s like they jog for two hours a day and then they think they’re morally right. That’s when you want to choke people, you know? Liam Neeson IT’S not hard to picture Liam Neeson in a boxing ring. His six-foot-four-inch frame still supports the impressively muscled physique that made him Northern Ireland’s teenage boxing champ. But the image of pugilist toughness is allayed agreeably by Neeson’s face his handsomeness, while undeniably rooted in the ruggedness of his features, is tempered by a distinctly sensitive cast to the eyes and mouth. The overall impression made is one of a man who could throw a solid punch if need be, but who would then likely help the recipient of the blow up off the floor, and probably buy him a pint, to boot.

His Catholic family was a distinct minority in the predominately Protestant town of Ballymena, but Neeson’s recollections of his upbringing in the bucolic burgh paint a picture of a hardworking community that witnessed little of the sectarian prejudice that plagues much of Northern Ireland. At the age of nine, Neeson began taking boxing lessons at the All Saints Youth Club; it wasn’t long …

Mickey Rourke Young

˜I thought my talent would transcend my outspokenness. I was wrong. Mickey Rourke GROWING up in a poor, black Miami neighborhood, Mickey Rourke showed talent as a baseball player and boxer but, for the most part, was majoring in juvenile delinquency before he got into acting. Studying the craft in New York, he had little luck supporting himself, but his move to L.A. quickly turned things around. After very fine performances in Body Heat and Diner, in the early eighties, he was in line for starring roles. With his rough, damaged good looks and sensuous intensity, Rourke won admirers (if not commercial success) in The Pope of Greenwich Village, Angel Heart, and Barfly. The actor also made his X-rated mark in some near-porn pictures, including 9 1/2 Weeks, in which he humiliated Kim Basinger, and Wild Orchid, in which he ravaged model Carre Otis, who became his off-screen obsession. Though Rourke’s choice of films has left much to be desired in recent years (his agent should be barred forever from Spago for letting him take part in the execrable Harley Davidson and the Marlboro Man), his solid character turn as an affable crooked lawyer in the 1997 Francis Ford Coppola-directed …

David Hyde Pierce Family Guy

˜I’ve really always wanted to get killed in a movie. And of course people have always told me I’d make a really great psycho-killerGod knows why. David Hyde Pierce DAVID HYDE PIERCE’S Niles Crane is such a beloved character on the NBC megahit Frasier that it’s a wonder co-star Kelsey Grammer’s ego can stand it. Almost more so than his sitcom sib Frasier, Niles seems to have a life of his own. There’s something intensely real about the endearingly pompous psychiatrist, something that chimes such strong bells that many viewers start laughing when the reedy-looking actor merely appears on-screen. The slightest twitch of Niles’ thin eyebrow or curl of his haughty lip can bring down the house. The show’s diverse audience, which finds the mixture of literary jokes and sight gags irresistible, seems to take special delight in Frasier’s priggish kid brother.

Pierce appears to have found a gold mine in Niles Crane, excelling, as he does, in bringing Niles’ brittle wit, fussy demeanor, and ardent but unconsummated passion for Daphne (Jane Leeves) into sharp and hilarious focus. If it is tempting to think that he was born to play the role, one can understand whya look back on Pierce’s …

Joe Pesci Height

˜I couldn’t get any jobs, and when that happens, you get so humble it’s disgusting. I didn’t feel like a man anymoreI felt really creepy. I was bumping into walls and saying, “Excuse me.” Joe Pesci A GENUINE child star, Joe Pesci was on radio at four, on Broadway at five, and a regular on the TV variety show Star Time Kids at ten. In his twenties, he sang in nightclubs and on records–under the name Joe Ritchie–before playing guitar with Joey Dee and the Starliters. He then tried his luck in Hollywood, and failed, so he returned to New York to run an Italian restaurant in the Bronx. That’s when Robert De Niro and Martin Scorsese, who had caught his performance in a little-known movie called Death Collector, asked him to read for the part of Jake LaMotta’s brother in Raging Bull. The role gained him a 1980 Oscar nomination for Best Supporting Actor and steady, small roles throughout the eighties. In 1989, audiences woke up to Pesci’s talent as a comic creep when he stole his scenes with Mel Gibson and Danny Glover in Lethal Weapon 2 (he has since reprised his popular Leo Getz characterization in two …

Luke Perry 90210

˜Even Michael J. Fox got called the next James Dean. They just want him to be alive and kicking, and he isn’t. So get over it! Luke Perry, on his frequent comparison to Dean LUKE PERRY was the resident Rebel Without a Clue on Beverly Hills 90210 for so long that he started to look like James Dean’s older, more grizzled uncle. Growing up in a small farming community in Ohio, Perry could not have imagined that he would one day incite a mob of 10,000 squealing teenagers to attack him in a suburban shopping mall. A mediocre student with talents for flirting and getting into mischief, he first satisfied his urge to act by donning yellow tights, red feathers, a cape, and webbed feet as “Freddie Bird,” his school’s mascot. Following graduation, he hotfooted it to Hollywood, where he earned money for his acting classes by working in a doorknob factory, laying asphalt, and selling shoes. He tallied 216 failed auditions before landing a role as country bumpkin Ned Bates on the New York-filmed daytime drama Loving, a gig which led in turn to work in Levi’s 501 commercials and a stint on another soap, Another World.

After returning …

Bill Paxton Movies

˜It’s very liberating to be naked in front of a hundred people, but there’s nothing sexual about lovemaking on a movie set. Bill Paxton MOST actors talk big about taking on challenging parts, but Bill Paxton knows what really separates the men from the boys. In 1994’s True Lies, he played the role of a slick, womanizing used-car salesman who has a terrifying run-in with Arnold Schwarzenegger’s super-spy, Harry Tasker. “I had to beg for my life and say I had a little penis,” he remembers. “That line would have scared off a lot of lesser men, but I relished it.” With an attitude like that, it’s no surprise that most of Paxton’s over 40 box-office and television film credits have come from quirky supporting assignments as characters who suffer death, humiliation, or both. But those days look to be long over: in 1995, he co-starred in Apollo 13 with Tom Hanks and Kevin Bacon; 1996 saw him share top billing with Helen Hunt in another mega-success, Twister; and 1997 brought yet another record-pulverizing vehicle, in the form of Titanic.

Born and raised in Fort Worth, Texas, Paxton discovered his acting aspirations during high school, when he and several friends …